Symbol of the Cross

Part 3

The basic difference in the way Mormon’s and Christians see the cross demonstrates how vastly different Mormonism is from Biblical Christianity.

 

But many Latter-day Saints will say that they do not see a big difference between Christianity and Mormonism.

Contrary to what Latter-day Saint leaders have taught – the cross is far more than just the instrument of death the Romans used to kill the physical body of Jesus.  It plays a significant role in the salvation of all who choose to follow Jesus.

What He did on the cross is everything the Good News represents: it’s the work of Christ for man, the shed blood, the hope, the miracle, our justification, our sanctification, and our very eternal life.

Is the cross an offense to Latter-day Saints or is it a symbol of joy, peace, and God’s great love?

Latter Day Saints who have been raised in a Mormon beliefs do admit that they have had somewhat of an aversion for the symbol of the cross.  Probably most Latter-day Saints feel the same way.

 Probably, much of it has to do with the teachings and attitudes that have been passed down from parents, teachers and leaders.

Listen, this is very important!  How you, view the cross is very dependent on whether you have been spiritually reborn and whether you truly understand Jesus.

Galatians 6:14?

“But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world.”

 

Paul doesn’t say he glories in ordinances, in church membership, priesthood authority, family, or baptism.  He says he glories ONLY “in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.”

What if that became the main, focus of your LDS Mission and the rest of life?

Anything added to what Christ accomplished on the cross for us is useless.  It ends up being works-based “Religion”.  It causes us to take our eyes off the cross and give attention to non- essential matters.

What greater ploy could there be than to get people – well-meaning people – to take their eyes off the very place where they were each reconciled to God.  And to have them look up at a golden angel on a building that inspires the proud hearts of men!

I just pray that Latter-day Saints everywhere like yourselves will demand that those golden images on top of their most sacred buildings would be replaced with crosses and cease officiating in man-made ordinances.

Elders, I want you to understand all that’s commanded of us is summarized in one verse of the Bible.

1 John 3:23.

“And this is his commandment, that we should believe on the name of his Son Jesus Christ, and love one another, as he gave us commandment.”

With that commandment in mind - to believe on Jesus Christ and love one another – I’d like to explain how it applies to the symbolic meaning of the cross.

The vertical post pointing upwards toward heaven represents our, belief in Jesus and our direct relationship with God.  The horizontal cross beam placed on that post reaching outward represents our relationship with others.  As Jesus loved God and others, we are called to do the same.

 

 

 

The basic difference in the way Mormon’s and Christians see the cross demonstrates how vastly different Mormonism is from Biblical Christianity.

 

But many Latter-day Saints will say that they do not see a big difference between Christianity and Mormonism.

Contrary to what Latter-day Saint leaders have taught – the cross is far more than just the instrument of death the Romans used to kill the physical body of Jesus.  It plays a significant role in the salvation of all who choose to follow Jesus.

What He did on the cross is everything the Good News represents: it’s the work of Christ for man, the shed blood, the hope, the miracle, our justification, our sanctification, and our very eternal life.

Is the cross an offense to Latter-day Saints or is it a symbol of joy, peace, and God’s great love?

Latter Day Saints who have been raised in a Mormon beliefs do admit that they have had somewhat of an aversion for the symbol of the cross.  Probably most Latter-day Saints feel the same way.

 Probably, much of it has to do with the teachings and attitudes that have been passed down from parents, teachers and leaders.

Listen, this is very important!  How you, view the cross is very dependent on whether you have been spiritually reborn and whether you truly understand Jesus.

Galatians 6:14?

“But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world.”

Paul doesn’t say he glories in ordinances, in church membership, priesthood authority, family, or baptism.  He says he glories ONLY “in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ.”

What if that became the main, focus of your LDS Mission and the rest of life?

Anything added to what Christ accomplished on the cross for us is useless.  It ends up being works-based “Religion”.  It causes us to take our eyes off the cross and give attention to non- essential matters.

What greater ploy could there be than to get people – well-meaning people – to take their eyes off the very place where they were each reconciled to God.  And to have them look up at a golden angel on a building that inspires the proud hearts of men!

I just pray that Latter-day Saints everywhere like yourselves will demand that those golden images on top of their most sacred buildings would be replaced with crosses and cease officiating in man-made ordinances.

Elders, I want you to understand all that’s commanded of us is summarized in one verse of the Bible.

1 John 3:23.

“And this is his commandment, that we should believe on the name of his Son Jesus Christ, and love one another, as he gave us commandment.”

With that commandment in mind - to believe on Jesus Christ and love one another – I’d like to explain how it applies to the symbolic meaning of the cross.

The vertical post pointing upwards toward heaven represents our, belief in Jesus and our direct relationship with God.  The horizontal cross beam placed on that post reaching outward represents our relationship with others.  As Jesus loved God and others, we are called to do the same.